Aspen Snowboarder Chris Klug among the pioneers inducted to snowsport HOF.

Mr. Luxury Ski

Snowboarder Chris Klug won bronze at the Salt Lake City 2002 Olympic Games.

Snowboarder Chris Klug won bronze at the Salt Lake City 2002 Olympic Games.

A collection of legendary skiers convened April 9 in Aspen to induct the Class of 2015 into the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame.

The New Class comprises seven athletes and snow sport pioneers, from freestyle innovators to Olympic medalists, to resort developers.

“The Class of 2015 represents a great cross section of pioneering sport builders and highly accomplished athletes,” said Hall of Fame Chairman Tom Kelly.

Left to Right: Hall of Famers Chris Davenport, Klaus Obermeyer and Billy Kidd at the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame induction at the St. Regis Aspen. (USSA)

Left to Right: Hall of Famers Chris Davenport, Klaus Obermeyer and Billy Kidd at the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame induction at the St. Regis Aspen. (USSA)

A highlight of the soiree, held at the swanky St. Regis Aspen, was the induction of Aspen’s own Chris Klug into the hall.  The homegrown star snowboarded in three Olympic Games winning a bronze medal in snowboarding giant slalom at Salt Lake City in 2002. The podium run came just 18 months after he had undergone a liver transplant due to a birth defect that challenged him throughout his career. He authored To The Edge and Back and founded the Chris Klug Foundation to help promote organ donation.

“I absolutely loved it, what a powerful night,” said Klug. “The history and stories in the room on Saturday were incredible, so honored to be a part of it.

HALL OF FAME CLASS OF 2015

U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame class of 2015 including (from left) Lessing Stern (Edgar Stern), Genia Fuller, Harry Kaiser, Chris Klug, Bob Salerno, Jim Martinson and David Ingemie. (USSA)

U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame class of 2015 including (from left) Lessing Stern (Edgar Stern), Genia Fuller, Harry Kaiser, Chris Klug, Bob Salerno, Jim Martinson and David Ingemie. (USSA)

Genia Fuller (Framingham, MA)

An ambassador to the early years of hot dog skiing and an innovator in pole-free ski ballet. During eight years of competition, Fuller’s smile, laugh and genuine love for freestyle made her one of the sport’s sweethearts. Her multi discipline abilities in freestyle, aerials and ballet led her to World Championship titles in 1975 and 1978.

David Ingemie (McLean, VA)

The President and CEO of SnowSports Industries America (SIA) since 1981, Ingemie retired from his position in January 2016. His boundless energy, enthusiasm and intelligence were monumental for building a healthy national snowsports trade association, garnering high regard for his work throughout the industry.

Henry Kaiser (New York City)

Forerunner in the ski industry for 35 years as the publisher of Skiing magazine. Kaiser helped advance the freestyle skiing movement by finding sponsors and providing a platform for the sport on the pages of Skiing. Often referred to as the “First Family of Skiing” he and his wife, Carolyn, helped raise over a million dollars for the U.S. Ski Team, most notably through engagement with the New York Ski Ball. They were also closely involved with the SIA.

Chris Klug (Aspen, CO)

Aspen’s own, Klug started his 20-year snowboarding career in 1983 on his Burton Backhill. He competed in three Olympic Games winning a bronze medal in snowboarding giant slalom at Salt Lake City in 2002 – an achievement coming just 18 months after he had undergone a liver transplant due to a birth defect that challenged him throughout his career. He authored To The Edge and Back and founded the Chris Klug Foundation to help promote organ donation.

Jim Martinson (Sumner, WA)

After the loss of his legs in 1967 during the Vietnam War, Martison doggedly pursued his passion for skiing and in 1985 invented a sit-ski he called “The Shadow.” It revolutionized adaptive skiing, and he went on to win a Winter Paralympic gold medal in 1992. Back in 2009 he became the oldest person to compete in the Winter X Games.

Bob Salerno (Ogden, UT)

A true legend of freestyle who competed at the top levels successfully for over 25 years. In 1974 Salerno took gold in aerials at the World Championships in Heavenly, CA. In 1998 he claimed first place at the Wayne Wong World Championships in Hot Dog Skiing. He is one of the sport’s leading celebrities being featured in Warren Miller and Willy Bogner films while also devoting his time to enhancing the sport through his writing, filming and creation of ‘Virtual Snow’ ski training simulators.

Edgar Stern (Park City, UT)

Stern was a visionary for skiing in Utah. After investing in the Park City Ski Area and luring the U.S. Ski Team to Park City, he turned his attention to what became Deer Valley, which opened in 1981. Through his efforts it has remained one of the top resorts in the country, including playing a pivotal role in the 2002 Olympic Winter Games. Stern passed away in 2008.

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